Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Stepped Outside with the new camera

Greetings from the Hermit Writer. I haven't had a chance to go out yet with the new camera. But we had a power failure which interrupted my manic lying (novel writing).


Dangling sycamore leaf


Neighbor's scooter


Sissy and Hank. (Hank has play dates with Sissy on Mondays and Wednesdays. They're big pals.)


"Honest, Dad. I didn't do anything." Yet.


Hank: "Yep. I'm innocent too. Can we go in now. It's hot."


Tuesday, June 28, 2016

What You Can Find...

...in a long photo. Greetings from the Hermit Writer. Last week after picking my bike up at the shop I drove out to the country for a ride/shoot. Took a SINGLE photo...got on my bike...and the derailleur went nuts again, jammed into spokes bent things. But look closer at the one shot :)


Just an open field.


Until I looked closer


A mama, papa and baby crane on the horizon. 


Sunday, June 26, 2016

Playing with my New Camera

Greetings from the Hermit Writer. Got a new click-box (Nikon D7100). A little devastated I haven't made it out for a good photo safari...but I don't want you to forget me.












Saturday, June 25, 2016

Mud Wrestling 101

Greetings from the Hermit Writer. Sissy had a blast playing with Buddy this morning. The clean up was meh.

The water in the kiddie pool got disgusting really quickly

Followed by white dog turning brown

Oh, yeah. What fun

Let's just wallow in the mud

"Thanks, Dad. That was fun."

Halfway through the truck wash.

"Dad, not the face! Not the face!"

The tension builds.

Turning sparkly clean again.


Friday, June 24, 2016

Favorite Passage

From my work in process.

Michael likes plans. I was surprised he wasn’t talking through what we were going to do. As though it took a lot of synapses to figure emptying the bar was not our sole purpose.
I eagerly waited to see if Augie really could turn off someone’s lights from ninety miles away. So cool to know someone who can do that. I mean, I can get shot four times in five months and survive. That’s a miracle. But God is expected to do weird things. Not an autistic guy from the south side of Tampa.


Naked Fun on the Beach -2

Greetings from the Hermit Writer. You should only be here if you love dogs.









It's tough for dogs too, living in Florida



Thursday, June 23, 2016

Naked Fun on the Beach -1

Greetings from the Hermit Writer. They were mostly naked. A few had cute kerchiefs.






Cutie Patootie Cooper

My sweet Sissy.



Visiting Author Annalisa Crawford

Greetings. My friend Annalisa has a new book out. I asked her to stop by and tell us about her writing. I started her off with a tough question:

Rate the importance/emphasis of these literary elements in your writing, (1 being meh, 10 orgasmic): setting, character, plot, action, description

Hi Mac, great question. Right…

Setting: 3. To be honest, setting is one of the things that I add in later, usually at the request of an editor who can’t visualize the scene! Most of the time, it’s just not that important to me—most of my stories could probably happen in a vacuum.

Character: 10. Yes, the most important element, to me. One of the stories I wrote a few years ago started out as a conversation between two women. There were no speech tags, no action, just dialogue—I wanted to see if I could tell a story by the conversation alone. Eventually, I rounded it out to submit it, but it was an interesting experiment that I would like to try again.

Plot: 8. My plot usually comes from my characters, but it’s obviously important, because it’s why readers keep reading. You can have interesting characters, but if they don’t have a reason for being together, there’s no story.

Action: 6-ish. I think action is important in genre fiction a lot more than in the gap I’ve slipped into. My characters are more likely to discuss why that action was important than to take part in it.


Description: 7. I probably find description much more important as a reader than as a writer. I remember some of my favourite books because of the beautiful words the author used to convey the setting and the characters. As I grow as a writer, this is becoming more important. A competition judge once said I conveyed an awful lot in what I didn’t say. That remains one of my favourite compliments.


You. I. Us.
Publication date: June 10, 2016
Genre: Short Stories (Single Author)


In You. I. Us., Annalisa Crawford captures everyday people during  poignant defining moments in their lives: An artist puts his heart into his latest sketch, an elderly couple endures scrutiny by a fellow diner, an ex-student attempts to make amends with a girl she bullied at school, a teenager holds vigil at his friend’s hospital bedside, long distance lovers promise complete devotion, a broken-hearted widow stares into the sea from the edge of a cliff where her husband died, a grieving son contacts the only person he can rely on in a moment of crisis, a group of middle-aged friends inspire each other to live remarkable lives.

Day after day, we make the same choices. But after reading You. I. Us., you’ll ask yourself, “What if we didn’t?”


About the author
Annalisa Crawford lives in Cornwall UK, with a good supply of moorland and beaches to keep her inspired. She lives with her husband, two sons, a dog and a cat. Annalisa writes dark contemporary, character-driven stories. She has been winning competitions and publishing short stories in small press journals for many years, and is the author of Cat & The Dreamer and Our Beautiful Child.

www.annalisacrawford.com

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

More Sights at the Mall

Greetings from the Hermit Writer. Dina has adjusted to me carrying the camera everywhere we go.

This guy was waiting for the Men's Warehouse to open.

This nice lady was shopping for lipstick.

The old men wear such cute hats.

And wear such cute widdle shoes.

"Who took my walker?"

"I came early to avoid the rush. It's just rush, rush, rush."

"Hey you kids! Don't run!"

"I hate it when they ignore me."

"The lady's room is down on the left."